Hatshepsut

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by MrsWolles
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Ancient History
Grade:
6

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Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut also known as Hatchepsut meaning foremost of noble ladies ; ruled 1508-1458 fifth pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty of ancient egypt. After her father Thutmose I died she married her brother Thutmose II and had a daughter Neferure and the male heir was an infant, born to a concubine named Isis. After thutmose II died she gained the power of pahraoh.Hatshepsut’s successful transition from queen to pharaoh was, in part, due to her ability to recruit influential supporters, and many of the men she chose had been favored officials of her father, Thutmose I.

Accomplishments

Hatshepsut established the trade networks that had been disrupterd during the hykos occupation of eygpt during the second intermediate period; therebye building the wealth of the eighteenth dynasty.

Lasting Impact

Citations

- http://www.thenagain.info/webchron/africa/Hatshepsut.html- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortuary_Temple_of_Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut's Temple

Biography

Hatshepsut

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, the Djeser-Djeseru, is located beneath the cliffs at Deir el Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt

She built the temple Djeser-djeseru ("holiest of holy places"), which was dedicated to Amon and served as her funerary cult, and erected a pair of red granite obelisks at the Temple of Amon at Karnak, one of which still stands today. Hatshepsut also had one notable trading expedition to the land of Punt in the ninth year of her reign. The ships returned with gold, ivory and myrrh trees, and the scene was immortalized on the walls of the temple.

The Mummy

Death

The queen died in early February of 1458 B.C. of unknown causes.Late in his reign, Thutmose III began a campaign to eradicate Hatshepsut’s memory: He destroyed or defaced her monuments, erased many of her inscriptions and constructed a wall around her obelisks. While some believe this was the result of a long-held grudge, it was more likely a strictly political effort to emphasize his line of succession and ensure that no one challenged his son Amunhotep II for the throne.


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