Harlem Renaissance

In Glogpedia

by Pinki27
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
African-American History
Grade:
8

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Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance

After the Civil War, now-free African American's were trying to find a safe way to express themselves, and in a safe place as well. They found this safety in Harlem. And their way to express themselves, was through art and literature. Therefore, creating the Harlem Renaissance.

Time Line

1890

The Great Migration

The Great Migration was the time period from 1916 to 1970 when a lot of African Americans traveled from the South, up to the North in order to have better opportunites for themselves and their chlildren.

The New Negro movement was a time where African Americans promoted their renewed sense of ratcial pride, cultural expression of the artists and their political beliefs, economic independance, and progression of their involvment in politics.

The Harlem Renaissance ended when the Great Depression struck. The lack of money ended the enthusiasm of the "Roarin' 20's." Also, when the Harlem Riot in 1935 happened, the blacks and whites were torn apart and again didn't want to be around each other. When this happened, Harlem was no longer considered the "mecca" for African Americans. The Harlem Renaissance was officially over.

The Cotton Club was a night club. It opened in 1923 and closed in 1940. The cotton club was a white-only club that often had African American performers. Some of the musicians that frequently performed there were Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Jelly Roll Morton, and Louis Armstrong.

Instead of using political movement to express their new-found independence, African Americans civil rights activists used artists to incorcorporate their beliefs into art, music, dance, and theater. This is how they got their polictical beliefs across to the public.

1918

Start of the Renaissance

1923

Cotton Club was opened

1920's

1933

New Negro Movement

End of the Harlem Renaissance


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