Giraffes

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by toothpick3146
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Zoology
Grade:
6

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Giraffes

Did you know? Can you believe that giraffes are the tallest land animals.Did you know giraffes moo?Just like snowflakes and human fingerprints, no two giraffes have the same spot pattern.

DIET (what it eats)Their long necks help giraffes eat leaves from tall trees, typically acacia trees. If they need to, giraffes can go for several days without water. Instead of drinking, giraffes stay hydrated by the moisture from leaves.

How it protects itself A women giraffes kick can kill a lion instently.Giraffes have small "horns" or knobs on top of their heads that grow to be about five inches long. These knobs are used to protect the head in fights

By: Lexie

Giraffes

Giraffes favorite food (acacia)

AdaptationsGiraffes use their long necks to reach for leaves high in trees. They only have seven vertebrae in their necks, the same as humans. Their front legs are longer than their back legs, which also helps them to reach the treetops. Their uniquely-patterned coats camouflage them from predators. Their lips are tough to protect them against scratches from the acacia thorns. Like camels, giraffes can go for long periods of time without drinking water

Features Scientific name: Giraffa camelopardalisDaily sleep: 4.6 h (In captivity)Gestation period: 400 – 460 dSpeed: 50 km/h (Endurance Running) The male giraffe can be as tall as 16 feet tall and 3,000 pounds.The female giraffe can be as tall as 14 to 15 feet tall

Disadvatagesit is difficult and dangerous for a giraffe to drink at a water hole. To do so they must spread their legs and bend down in an awkward position that makes them vulnerable to predators like Africa's big cats.

ThreatsGiraffes are hunted for their meat, coat and tails. The tail is prized for good luck bracelets, fly whisks and string for sewing beads. The coat is used for shield coverings. Habitat destruction and fragmentation are also threats to giraffe populations.


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