[2015] Shohom Chakraborty: Giovanni da Verrazzano

In Glogpedia

by mitkoff
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Explorers and Discovers
Grade:
5

Toggle fullscreen Print glog

Read Only  


[2015] Shohom Chakraborty: Giovanni da Verrazzano

By: Shohom Chakraborty

Verrazzano wrote interesting, though sometimes wrong, accounts of the lands and inhabitants that he saw. His journey ended at the eastern part of Newfoundland. His return to France on July 8, gave King Francis I claim to a lot of land in the New World.

He began pursuing a maritime career. (means like your job has something to do with ships)

Verrazzano convinced Francis the I that he would be the right man to undertake exploratory voyages to the West on for France, and Francis the I signed on.

Giovanni da Verrazzano

1485

1506

1507

1522

1523

1528

1527

Verrazzano died in 1528. His fleet sailed to Florida, the Bahamas, and finally the Lesser Antilles. He anchored there off one of the islands (Guadeloupe), went ashore, and was captured, killed, and eaten by the Carib tribe.

Giovanni set sail for the New World on his ship; The La Dauphine. He also secured two ships for a voyage backed by Francis the I to discover a westward passage to Asia.

Giovanni da Verrazzano was born in Tuscany, Italy

Verrazzano met King Francis The I, his expedition sponsor

Tuscany, Italy

Interesting FactsThe Verrazzano bridge in NY was named after him. He sailed as a pirate and was hostile to spanish and portugese ships.He was one of the few explorers that sailed for FranceHe was the only sailor to anchor away from shoreHe was eaten by people in a tribe called the Caribs, from which the name Carribean comes from.

1524

He started a voyage and commanded a group of ships went to Brazil and got a lot of dyewood which was very profitable.

Verrazzano's voyage route

Originally, Verrazzano was looking for a way to the Pacific Ocean and Asia

His discovery was important because it gave France its claim to the new world

Lesser Antilles


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.