Fritz Haber

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by matthewdowns
Last updated 3 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Scientific Biographies
Grade:
8

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Fritz Haber

FritzHaber

Fritz Haber worked for Hitler in WWI. Hitler told him that he needed to find a way to kill a large number of troups. On April 22, 1915, Haber followed orders and released chlorine gas in France which killed 10,000 troops.

Haber wrote a book called Practical Results of the Theoretical Development of Chemistry. This book was about how he recorded the production of small amounts of ammonia from N2 and H2 at a temperature of 1000° C with the help of iron as a catalyst.

Haber had two spouces, Charolotte Nathan and Clara Immerwahr. Clara and Fritz were married from 1901-1915. Clara died in 1915 after they had 1 child. Then Fritz married Charolotte. He was married to her from 1917-1927. They had two kids.

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Lasting Impact

He helped get nitrogen gas and made fertilizer which helped grow healthy food. He published a book about thermodynamics and gas reactions in 1905. In this book he tells us the theoretical process of producing ammonia from hydrogen and nitrogen. The world's population grew from 1.6 billion people in 1900 to six billion in 2000. This would not have been possible without the synthesis of ammonia. Without his discover of how to make ammonia the world would be much smaller in the amoount in people.

Accomplisments

Birth & Death

Fritz Haber was born on December 9, 1868 in Wroclaw, Poland. HIs parents were Siegfred and Paula Haber. Fritz died on January 29, 1934.

Fritz Haber was known for the invention of a large-scale catalytic synthesis of ammonia from elemental hydrogen and nitrogen gas. In 1911 he was appointed director of Institute for pysical and electrochemisty at Berlin. He recieved the nobel prize in chemisty in 1918 for the synthesis of ammonia from its elements.

Haber discovered a way for people to live while he was trying to find a way to kill people.


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