Underground Railroad Creative Writing - Frederick Douglass

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by lisastring
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Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Writers Biographies
Grade:
6

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Underground Railroad Creative Writing - Frederick Douglass

On a cold night in 1851, I heard a faint knock on my door. When I opened it, I saw an unfamiliar man standing on my doorstep. He was ragged and tired. Cautiously he said "A friend of a friend sent me." I knew at once he was a runaway slave seeking my help. As a outspoken opponent of slavery and supporter of the Underground Railroad, I let him in at once. I myself was born a slave, but eventually learned to read and write and was able to escape in 1838. I have spent my life writing and speaking about the evils of slavery and advocating for the emancipation of all slaves. At this time, I am a station master in Rochester, NY and have helped hundreds of people like this man escape further north. The man was hungry and I sat him to the table and fed him a meal. I told him that in the morning, I would help him continue on his journey to freedom.

Frederick Douglass

My autobiography was first published in 1845 and was very important to the abolitionist movement.

Cedar Hill, my home in Washington D.C. is a National Historic Site.

A map of escape routes for the Underground Railroad

A letter I wrote to President Abraham Lincoln about plans to help slaves escape from rebel states during the Civil War.

A postage stamp with my image was issued in 1965 during the Civil Rights Movement.

What would I do if a slave came to my door...

Frederick Douglass. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frederick_Douglass_%282%29.jpg>. Frederick Douglass. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frederick_Douglass_as_a_younger_man.jpg>. Frederick Douglass. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h2962.html>. Frederick Douglass House. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frederick_Douglass_House.jpg>. Frederick Douglass Letter to Lincoln. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mal/mal1/356/3565200/001.jpg>. "Frederick Douglass." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1539.html>. "Frederick Douglass." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1539.html>. Frederick Douglass Stamp. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frederickdouglass.jpg>. "Frederick Douglass." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Douglass>. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=lhbcb&fileName=25385//lhbcb25385.db&recNum=2&itemLink=r?ammem/lhbcbbib:@field%28NUMBER+@od1%28lhbcb+25385%29%29&linkText=0>. "Timeline of Frederick Douglass and Family." Mathematics Department. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://www.math.buffalo.edu/~sww/0history/hwny-douglass-family.html>. Underground Railroad Escape Routes. Digital image. Web. 14 Nov. 2010. <http://www.nationalgeographic.com/railroad/map.html>.

I lived in Rochester, New York


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