Francisco Pizarro

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by gulla23
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Explorers and Discovers
Grade:
5,6,7,8

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Francisco Pizarro

FranciscoPizarro

Early Life Francisco Pizarro was born in 1476 in Trujillo Spain. No one knows exactly when he was born. Francisco's father was a poor sea captain. Pizarro was Roman Catholic. Francisco was second cousins to Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes. Pizarro handled his father's pigs for sometime and earned the nickname "swineherder". When Francisco was a teenager he joined the Spanish army. In 1513 Pizarro joined Vasco Nunez de Balboa to the Pacific ocean, which was then called the "South Sea".

Francisco was a minor Spanish official on the Isthmus of Panama until he was almost 50. In 1522 Pizarro became mayor of Panama. In 1531 Francisco left Panama with 3 ships, 180 men, and 70 horses. When Pizarro was in Peru the ruler Atahualpa sent Pizarro messages to go back to Panama, but Pizarro did not back down. He kept marching until he got to Atahualpa's city. He eventually tricked Atahualpa into coming into a meeting room with Francisco were Pizarro's men finished the job after he recieved the promised gold. Soon after, Pizarro conquered Peru in 1533. Francisco rules peacefully until the battle of Cuzco. Diego Almagro who went on a reconnaissance with Pizarro in 1524 wanted more in the empire. Almagro's rebellion lost and Pizarro had him executed. On June 26 1541 Francisco Pizarro was assasinated by supporters of Almagro. He was 65.

Voyages

ImpactThe Inca languages were mostly replaced by Spanish. The Spanish people in Peru became very rich. The Inca culture began to die because of his rule. Motives

Motives In 1524 he set out to find the Inca empire. It took him many attempts, but he found it. Pizarro accepted a ransom for Atahualpa but never had intentions to set Atahualpa free. So, he had Atahualpa executed.

What he found Francisco Pizarro discovered Peru. Francisco Pizarro with Diego de Almagro discovered the San Juan river.

CreditsBiography.com, Youtube, Google, Allaboutexplorers.com, Thepirateking.com, marinersmuseum.org, Francisco Pizarro and the conquest of the Incaisby by Gina DeAngelis, Francisco Pizarro Famous Explorers


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