fireplace cooking

by LynnC
Last updated 9 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
History

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fireplace cooking

The kitchen welcomed with a merry fire and the scent of Indian pudding, corn bread and roast chicken. The home's mistress is preparing an inviting meal in the hearth and bee hive oven. The process of baking in the beehive oven involves building a fire (scotch pine works well) and feeding that fire for approximately 2 1/2 hours until the oven is good and hot. Traditionally, the cook tested the temperature of the oven by placing a hand in the oven and counting how many seconds before she would have to remove her hand. 30 seconds was the perfect temperature for her tempting Indian pudding.The kitchen welcomed with a merry fire and the scent of Indian pudding, corn bread and roast chicken. Lynn Cullity dressed in historical garb, prepared an inviting meal in the hearth and bee hive oven. The process of baking in the beehive oven involves building a fire (scotch pine works well) and feeding that fire for approximately 2 1/2 hours until the oven is good and hot. Traditionally, the cook tested the temperature of the oven by placing a hand in the oven and counting how many seconds before she would have to remove her hand. Lynn, using this method, was able to count just above 30 seconds which was the perfect temperature for her tempting Indian pudding. Lynn says she is not afraid to experiment with receipts in historical cookbooks which are often vague. Those lucky enough to sample her cooking would agree that her experimentation has certainly paid off!The kitchen welcomed with a merry fire and the scent of Indian pudding, corn bread and roast chicken. Lynn Cullity dressed in historical garb, prepared an inviting meal in the hearth and bee hive oven. The process of baking in the beehive oven involves building a fire (scotch pine works well) and feeding that fire for approximately 2 1/2 hours until the oven is good and hot. Traditionally, the cook tested the temperature of the oven by placing a hand in the oven and counting how many seconds before she would have to remove her hand. Lynn, using this method, was able to count just above 30 seconds which was the perfect temperature for her tempting Indian pudding. Lynn says she is not afraid to experiment with receipts in historical cookbooks which are often vague. Those lucky enough to sample her cooking would agree that her experimentation has certainly paid off!

Receipt Against the PlagueReceipt to Protect from the PlagueTake of rue, sage, mint, rosemary, wormwood, and lavender, a handful of each; infuse them together in a gallon of white wine vinegar, put the whole into a stone pot, closely covered up, upon wood ashes for four days, after which draw off (or strain through fine flannel) the liquid, and put it into bottles well corked; and into every quart bottle put a quarter of an once of camphor: with this preparation wash your mouth, and rub your loins and your temples every day; snuff a little up your nostrils when you go into the air, and carry about you a bit of spunge dipped in the same, in order to smell to upon all occasions, especially when you are near any place or person that is infected. They write, that four malefactors, (who had robbed the infected houses, and murdered the people during the course of the plague,) owned, when they came to the gallows, that they had preserved themselves from the contagion by using the above medicine only: and that they went the whole time from house to house without any fear of the distemper.

Benjamin Nye Homestead and MuseumEast Sandwich, MassAutumn Gathering 2011

Cornbread baked in an iron spider in the fireplace hearth. Grapevine leaves were used to line the bottom of the pan to prevent burning.


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