FACS: List Steps In Using Recipe

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by rholloway1
Last updated 4 years ago

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Health & Fitness
Subject:
Culinary Arts
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7,8,9,10,11,12

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FACS: List Steps In Using Recipe

Randi Jo HollowayWednesday 4:15

List steps in using a recipe 8.5

RecipePreheat oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour and baking soda; set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter with both sugars; beat on medium speed until light and fluffy. Reduce speed to low; add the salt, vanilla, and eggs. Beat until well mixed, about 1 minute. Add flour mixture; mix until just combined. Stir in the chocolate chips. WATCH: How to Measure FlourDrop heaping tablespoon-size balls of dough about 2 inches apart on baking sheets lined with parchment paper.Bake until cookies are golden around the edges, but still soft in the center, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from oven, and let cool on baking sheet 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack, and let cool completely. Store cookies in an airtight container at room temperature up to 1 week.

Ingredients2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon baking soda1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature1/2 cup granulated sugar1 cup packed light-brown sugar1 teaspoon salt2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract2 large eggs2 cups (about 12 ounces) semisweet and/or milk chocolate chips

Cookie tips

Cooking Techniques

You like soft and chewy. He likes thin and crispy. If only there were a way to bake chocolate chip cookies to please everyone.There is! And, no, it's not Martha Stewart's way. It's science.We've taken our cues from a few spots: a bioengineering grad student named Kendra Nyberg, who co-taught a class at the University of California, Los Angeles called Science and Food, and chef and cookbook author Tessa Arias, who writes about cookie science on her site, Handle the Heat.Engineering the perfect cookie: You can control the diameter and thickness of your favorite chocolate chip cookies by changing the temperature of the butter and the amount of flour in the dough.THE SALTCookie-Baking Chemistry: How To Engineer Your Perfect Sweet TreatThere's also an illuminating TEDEd animation on cookie science. And if you really want to go nuts (or no nuts, your call), Serious Eats offers 21 painstakingly tested steps for the "Perfect Cookie," including kneading times and chocolate prep techniques."Even though I can describe what I like," says Nyberg, "I didn't know the role of each ingredient in the texture and shape of cookies." So she looked into it — as only a scientist can.Here, relying on the experts' help and the classic Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, OZY presents no-fail tips for baking your perfect cookie. (You're welcome.)Ooey-gooey: Add 2 cups more flour.A nice tan: Set the oven higher than 350 degrees Fahrenheit (maybe 360). Caramelization, which gives cookies their nice brown tops, occurs above 356 degrees, says the TEDEd video.Crispy with a soft center: Use 1/4 teaspoon baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda.Chewy: Substitute bread flour for all-purpose flour.Just like store-bought: Trade the butter for shortening. Arias notes that this ups the texture but reduces some flavor; her suggestion is to use half butter and half shortening.Thick (and less crispy): Freeze the batter for 30 to 60 minutes before baking. This solidifies the butter, which will spread less while baking.Cakey: Use more baking soda because, according to Nyberg, it "releases carbon dioxide when heated, which makes cookies puff up."Butterscotch flavored: Use 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar (instead of the same amount of combined granulated sugar and light brown sugar).Uniformity: If looks count, add one ounce corn syrup and one ounce granulated sugar.More flavor: Chilling the dough for at least 24 hours before baking deepens all the flavors, Arias found.You like soft and chewy. He likes thin and crispy. If only there were a way to bake chocolate chip cookies to please everyone.There is! And, no, it's not Martha Stewart's way. It's science.We've taken our cues from a few spots: a bioengineering grad student named Kendra Nyberg, who co-taught a class at the University of California, Los Angeles called Science and Food, and chef and cookbook author Tessa Arias, who writes about cookie science on her site, Handle the Heat.Engineering the perfect cookie: You can control the diameter and thickness of your favorite chocolate chip cookies by changing the temperature of the butter and the amount of flour in the dough.THE SALTCookie-Baking Chemistry: How To Engineer Your Perfect Sweet TreatThere's also an illuminating TEDEd animation on cookie science. And if you really want to go nuts (or no nuts, your call), Serious Eats offers 21 painstakingly tested steps for the "Perfect Cookie," including kneading times and chocolate prep techniques."Even though I can describe what I like," says Nyberg, "I didn't know the role of each ingredient in the texture and shape of cookies." So she looked into it — as only a scientist can.Here, relying on the experts' help and the classic Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, OZY presents no-fail tips for baking your perfect cookie. (You're welcome.)Ooey-gooey: Add 2 cups more flour.A nice tan: Set the oven higher than 350 degrees Fahrenheit (maybe 360). Caramelization, which gives cookies their nice brown tops, occurs above 356 degrees, says the TEDEd video.Crispy with a soft center: Use 1/4 teaspoon baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda.Chewy: Substitute bread flour for all-purpose flour.Just like store-bought: Trade the butter for shortening. Arias notes that this ups the texture but reduces some flavor; her suggestion is to use half butter and half shortening.Thick (and less crispy): Freeze the batter for 30 to 60 minutes before baking. This solidifies the butter, which will spread less while baking.Cakey: Use more baking soda because, according to Nyberg, it "releases carbon dioxide when heated, which makes cookies puff up."Butterscotch flavored: Use 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar (instead of the same amount of combined granulated sugar and light brown sugar).Uniformity: If looks count, add one ounce corn syrup and one ounce granulated sugar.More flavor: Chilling the dough for at least 24 hours before baking deepens all the flavors, Arias found.

There’s nothing more satisfying than baking cookies at home — except maybe giving them to friends over the holidays! Here are our tips ' techniques for making the perfect batch, every time. Prep matters. Read your recipe, preheat the oven and assemble all of your ingredients before you get started. Use the best quality ingredients. Fresh ingredients really do make a difference, and your cookies will shine a lot brighter if you purchase best-quality essentials like sweet butter, ripe seasonal fruits, newly harvested nuts and high-end chocolate from a trusted source with a fairly high turnover (bulk bins are often a great option). Don’t skip the salt. Adding salt helps bring out the sweetness and flavor of cookies. To see for yourself, try an experiment: make two batches of cookies, leave out the salt in one, and do a taste test. Chances are you’ll like the salted version better. Stay smooth when measuring. Use dry measuring cups and liquid measuring cups for the appropriate ingredients to ensure the best results. For dry ingredients, use a large serving spoon to fill the measuring cup, then level off the top with a straight handle or a butter knife. To make measuring thick, sticky ingredients like molasses or honey easier, lightly spray the measuring pitcher with cooking spray before pouring in the ingredients. It will glide right out! Achieve the perfect texture. Many cookie recipes call for creaming butter and sugar, adding air and encouraging a light-textured finished treat. Try to use butter that is at cool room temperature. Cut it into chunks, about ½ inch in size, then add the chunks to a mixing bowl. Fit a stand mixer with a paddle attachment or a handheld mixer with the beater attachments and beat the butter for a minute or so to loosen it up. Add the sugar in a stream, then beat it on medium-high speed, scraping down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, until the mixture is light in color and fluffy. It should take about 3 minutes. Eliminate eggshells. If tiny eggshell fragments fall into a bowl of egg whites or yolks, you can scoop them up with an emptied half shell and they will readily cling to it. They are almost drawn to it as if magnetized! This works far better than using your fingers, a spoon or the tip of a knife. Keep hands clean and cool. Wetting your hands before working with sticky cookie dough helps ensure you don’t stick to it. Warm hands may also cause dough to melt and stick; try dipping your hands in ice water before handling. Wrap, roll and slice. Use parchment to help you shape uniform cookies in a flash. Place the dough on a sheet of parchment paper and shape carefully into a log (sprinkle with flour if the dough starts sticking to the paper). Refrigerate until firm, unwrap, and cut crosswise into slices about ¼ to 1/3-inch thick. Space the cookies out on a baking sheet and bake according to your recipe. Mind the temperature of your pan. Make sure your baking sheet is at room temperature when you arrange your cookie dough on it. If the pan is too hot the dough will melt and the cookies will spread into one another. If your pan is hot and you need to keep moving, try running cool water over the bottom of the baking sheet to cool it down. Pivot your pans. When baking cookies on multiple sheets, space two racks evenly in the oven and then switch and rotate the pans about halfway through baking. This will ensure even cooking. Use a rack. To ensure crisp bottoms, don’t let your cookies sit on the baking sheet for too long after they’ve come out of the oven. After the cookies have cooled for a few minutes, transfer them to a wire rack to cool (for as long as you can keep your hands off them). Freeze your dough. You can make cookie dough in advance and freeze it for a quick and easy from-scratch treat. Prepare the dough, portion it out onto a baking sheet and put the baking sheet in the freezer. Transfer the individual frozen portions into a lock-top plastic freezer bag and use as much or as little as you want at a time.


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