Evolution of Planes

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by kmazzone26
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Technology
Grade:
4,5,6,7,8,9,10

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Evolution of Planes

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747

On December 17, 1903 Orville and Wilbur Wright made the first successful aircraft in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In their first flight they were shot out of a sling shot. Some people believe that they did not really fly because they were shot out of a sling shot. The first flight by Orville at 10:35 of 120 feet in 12 seconds at a speed of 6.8 miles per hour.

Evaluation Of planes

Wright Brothers

Louis bleriot

Wright Brothers 1903

Louis Bleriot 1909

“Spirit of St Louis” was named in honor of Lindbergh's supporters in St Louis, Missouri who paid for the aircraft. “NYP” is an acronym for “ New York-Paris” the object of flight. May 20-21 1927 the single engine, single seat plane. It was flown by Charles Lindbergh. It was a non-stop flight from New York to Paris that took 33 hours and 30 minutes.

Louis Bleriot was born July 1, 1872 in Cambrai France. He made the first flight between the continental europe and Great Britain. The Bleriot XI is the aircraft used by Louis Bleriot on July 25, 1909 to make the first flight across the english Channel.

Spirt ofSt. Louis 1927

The 747 is the same model that most of our planes are today. This plane offered two different classes. It flow 416 passengers about 8,380 miles. This was used as a regular plane. People used these more and more as the years moved on. Today theses are even used in the military

The DC6 was one of the best inventions of its time. The DC 6 could hold 56 passengers. They would only sell 50 and there were 6 skylounge seats usable in flight. There were even seats that reclined into a bed. It engine was 4 Pratt & Whitney Double Wasp R-2800. It was the first plane to travel around the world regular. It traveled at 95 mph.

747 1967

DC61946

DC6

By: KatieMazzone

http://simviation.com//rinfo747.htmhttp://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/wright.htm


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