Evolution of Chinese Music

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by NonFiction33
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Arts & Music
Subject:
Music
Grade:
9

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Evolution of Chinese Music

-Teresa Teng expanded mandopop in Taiwan; beats censorship in the mainland.-Increasing popularity of cantopop.

-The dynastic period ends.-New China tries to find a national anthem-Beginning of active development of New Music in New Culture Movement.-Popular western classical music grew

-Decline of Shidaiqu.-Popularity of English pop around mid-1960s but beginning to fade by the late 1960s.-Beginning of cantopop in the late 1960s.-Popularizing of Huangmei tone.-Popularizing of Hong Kong musical tongue twister.

Evelution of Chinese Music

DynastyPeriods

1910s

1920s-30s

1940s-50s

1960s

1970s

20o0s

1980s-90s

-In the Xia, Shang and Zhou Dynasties, only royal families and dignitary officials enjoyed music(chimes and bells). -During the Tang Dynasty, dancing and singing entered the mainstream, spreading from the royal court to the common people.-Religious melodies were absorbed into Chinese music

-Shidaiqu started, which forms the basis of all Chinese pop music genres such as C-pop, mandopop and cantopop.-Development of modern Chinese orchestra.-Japanese enka influence Taiwanese pop.

-The Communist Party of China (CPC) labeled pop music as yellow music(bad music) -CPC promote national music.-Government control of music begins; via censorship.

-Instruments were the start of new music

-Tiananmen Square led to the popularizing of Northwest Wind.-Northwest wind became main music.-China begins the importation of gangtai music.-Northwest Wind evolves into Chinese rock in the late 1980s.-operas

-Chinese rock became prison music-Popularity of gangtai music.-Karaoke culture begins.-Taiwanese pop re-emergence.

-Punk rock -Chinese hip hop/Pop music-R'B-Folk music is still used occasionally for traditional festivals or ceremonies-Orchestra-Western, urban styles

Evolution of Chinese Music-Calculasian(1960s-2010s)


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