England Christmas

In Glogpedia

by Lebanon9
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
World Culture
Grade:
7

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England Christmas

Traditions:Christmas in England began in A.D. 596, when St Augustine landed on her shores with monks who wanted to bring Christianity to the Anglo Saxons.The gift giver is called Father Christmas. He wears a long red, or greewn, robe, and leaves presents in stockings and under the trees on Christmas Eve. However, the gifts are not usually opened until afternoon of the next day. The day after Christmas is called Boxing Day, because boys use to go around collecting money in clay boxes. When the boxes were full, they smashed them.

1) The English enjoy beautiful Christmas music. They love to decorate Christmas Trees and hang up evergreen branches.2) They often perform an activity by the name of "mummering". It has been an activity since the Middle Ages. In the activity, people will put on masks and perform plays.3) In England Christmas dinner was usually eaten at Midday on December 25, during daylight.

Activities

"Christmas in England"

by

Geraden Chambers

A big celebration in a town

Map of where Christmas is celebrated near the United Kingdom

England's Flag

A video of a celebration.

A group of people mummering in the streets.

Reflection: I really enjoyed this project. I'm proud to know that other countries celebrate Christmas as well. I actually think this project is fine it is. It was very fun to see how other countries celebrate their holidays. England, had a very intresting version of Santa, being Father Christmas and all. XD Also, thank you for allowing me to learn more. :D

My Choice:How to say Merry Christmas in England: Happy Christmas!Name for Santa: Father Christmas.Gifts that are given: There aren't really a certain kind of gifts in England, there's a wide variety.

Christmas Food in England:It seems that the most poular foods are fruit cake, or turkey, for example, an oven-roasted brine-soaked turkey.

An oven-roasted brine-soaked turkey.


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