Emma by Jane Austen

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Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Literature
Grade:
12

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Emma by Jane Austen

“Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.”

Emma by Jane Austin

“I am going to make a heroine whom no one but myself will much like” - Jane Austen

Match Making

The Arts

True Love

Vanity

"I do not think I can live without something of a musical society. I condition for nothing else; but without music, life would be a blank to me." - Mrs. Elton

“Were I to fall in love, indeed, it would be a different thing; but I have never been in love ; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall.” - Emma

“I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him.” - Emma

"It was foolish, it was wrong, to take so active a part in bringing any two people together.”

“Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them.”

“I cannot make speeches, Emma...If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it.” - Mr. Knightley

Badly done, Emma! - Mr. Knightley

“Vanity working on a weak head produces every sort of mischief.” - Mr. Knightley

“The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.”

"To take a dislike to a young man, only because he appeared to be of a different disposition from himself, was unworthy the real liberality of mind” - Mr. Knightley


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