Einstein's Contributions to Chemistry

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Einstein's Contributions to Chemistry

Born: March 14, 1879Birth Place: Ulm, Württemberg, GermanyDied: April 18, 1955Place of Death: Princeton, New Jersey

Personal LifeEinstein grew up in a secular, middle-class Jewish family. Hermann Einstein (his father) was a salesman, engineer and founder of a company which manufactured electrical equipment. His mother was a housewife and he had one sister. He was a highschool dropout, suffered from a speech impediment when he was young. He had trouble with the rigid schooling system. Refused to serve in the WWI, and even gave up his German citizenship. He moved to Zurich, finished highschool at 17 to attend the Swiss Federal Polytechnic School. Einstein wrote his first paper when he was 16. He made his first wife, Malieva Maric, in Zurich. They had a two sons together. In 1905, he had his breakthrough with the four most important papers of his life: the photoelectric effect, Brownian motion, special relativity, and the equivalence of matter and energy. Einstein began an affair in 1919 with one of his cousins, Elsa Löwenthal, whom he later married. Einstein moved to America before WWII (because he was Jewish). He helped develop the atomic bomb but after it was used on Japan began to actively particpate in deweaponizing it. He also was a civil rights activist and supported African Americans' rights.

Einstein's Contributions to Chemistry1) Photoelectric effect: when matter emits electrons upon exposure to electromagnetic radiation, such as photons of light. -essential to Quantum Chemistry and our daily lives2) Investigation of Brownian motion: illustrates the random movement of microscopic particles suspended in liquids or gases. -essential to understand diffusion, reactions, etc. 3) E= Mc^2: illustrates that mass and energy are the same physical entity and can be changed into each other.- essential for nuclear energy and the atomic bomb


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