Early Intervention

In Glogpedia

by min808
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Psychology

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Early Intervention

Risk factors:

Family members are a baby's greatest resource. They know the baby best and spend the most time with the baby. The baby gets food, shelter, love, and communication from family members. It is this last part, communication, that sets deaf and hard of hearing babies apart from other babies.Some people believe that children learn to read and write in kindergarten or first grade. That isn't true. Literacy skills begin developing at birth, when parents share stories, sing songs, or talk to each other and to the baby. Before the baby can read or write, the baby must develop language skills and ideas about the world.The family has a very important responsibility to make sure that the baby learns words and ideas about the world early on. If the baby has a hearing loss, the family may need support to help the baby learn language. How that support is given must fit the baby's and the family's needs. So, the family is a vital part of the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) development process.

Timeframe:Tieframes:

When the early intervention system receives a referral about a child with a suspected disability or developmental delay, a time clock starts running. Within 45 days, the early intervention system must complete the critical steps discussed thus far:

◾ screening (if used in the state)◾ initial evaluation of the child◾ initial assessments of the child and family ◾ writing the IFSP (if the child has been found eligible)

So, 45 days, that's the timeframe from referral to completion of theIFSP

At Early Intervention, we believe that no one knows your child as well as you. You are a partner in developing the IFSP, and it is important for you to be part of the process.You may want to think about some things as the process gets started:•What are some of the things you and your child do everyday?•What activities does your child enjoy doing? What activities are difficult for your child?•What do you need to support you as a family?•What are your hopes and dreams for your child?

Risk Factors:-Environmental factors such as poverty, homelessness, child abuse or neglect, parental age, and parent mental illness-Genetics (e.g., abnormal chromosome, low birth weight, premature)

Provider Roles:- Listen carefully to what you tell them- Share information about what they think- Help you obtain services or support you and your child may need to meet your outcomes within the EI program or community

Family Role:At Early Intervention, we believe that no one knows you rchild as well as you. You are a partner in developing the IIFSP, and it is important for you to be part of the process.

You may want to think about some things as the process gets started:- What are some of the things you and child do everyday?- What activities does your child enjoy doing? What activities are difficult for your child?- What do you need to support you as a family?- What are your hopes and dreams for your child?

EARLY INTERVENTION

Children are placed at genetic risk by being born with a genetic or chromosomal abnormality. A good example of a genetic risk is Down syndrome, a disorder that causes developmental delay because of an abnormal chromosome. Environmental risk results from exposure to harmful agents either before or after birth, and can include things like poor maternal nutrition or exposure to toxins (e.g. lead or drugs) or infections that are passed from a mother to her baby during pregnancy (e.g., measles or HIV). Environmental risk also includes a child's life experiences. For example, children who are born prematurely, face severe poverty, mother's depression, poor nutrition, or lack of care are at increased risk for developmental delays.

State's roles to to assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program.

State's Role:

Strategies:-Individualization: Do strategies build on child and family interest?- Context: Do strategies build on familiar places, people, and routines? - Mastery: Do strategies ensure generalization of a child's actions and interaction's in multiple setting and tasks?


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.