Early Automobiles

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by brendanrqz
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Inventors and Inventions
Grade:
11

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Early Automobiles

Steam

Gasoline

Diesel

Electric

"Early Automobiles"

1930s Mercedes-Benz 260D hit the road in 1936, the first series-production diesel passenger car. With the engine invented in 1893 by Rudolf Diesel, relied on compression rather than an electric spark to ignite the fuel. Diesel engines have inherently lower losses and are generally one-third more efficient than their gasoline counterparts.

1910 Electric Car: To inventor Thomas Edison in the early 1900s, electric cars looked like the future of transportation. Edison was best known for making the light bulb and motion pictures. But he also made three electric cars using his nickel-iron Edison Storage Batteries. By the time Edisons electric car took the journey to New York on a 1,000-mile promotional tour in September 1910. The Electric cars had already been on the road for 15 years.

Ford had a vision to create a car that was simple, affordable, and versatile car for the great multitude.Plans for the Model T were announced in March 1908, and the first car was released to the public on the same year on Oct. 1 at the Piquette Avenue Plant in Detroit, The car had a four-cylinder, 20-horsepower engine, 10-gallon gas tank and room for five people. It weighed 1,200 pounds and cost just $850.

The very first Stanley Steamer, built by the Stanley twin brothers F.E. and F.O.Construction of that car started in july 1897 and was completed by october 1897. After bulding the car they drove up a steep hill in 2 hours which otherwise would have taken 6 hours in a horse carriage.

These types of fuel were used because they had many good qualities that made cars easier to use.One of these fuels, steam, is no longer used in cars because its advantages are no longer important today.My prediction for the future is that most cars are now going to be using electric fuel.


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