Consumerism in America

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by sc18mcc
Last updated 8 months ago

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Language Arts
Subject:
Journalism
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Consumerism in America

How do Athletes, Endorsements, & How They Advertise Influence Consummerism in America?

Many athletes don't only focus on sports, yet they also act. As sports stars they help advertise and endorse products. The one of the earliest endorsements from a professional athlete is Muhammad Ali, he endorsed D-Con bug sprays. Many athletes with him began endorsing products. Some such as Babe Ruth who endorsed wheaties, Michael Jordan's has Nike shoes, Mel Ott and Carl Hubbell endorsed camel cigarettes, and many others. It has influenced many others to join. Tiger Woods in in Buick ads and many retired athletes are in Miller Light and other commercials.  Being in a commercial is gives fame for the athlete in the ad, but with fame comes fortune. Some of the top endorsed athletes in 2015 are Michael Jordan with Nike making $60 million. Second is, Lebron James also with Nike making $30 million. After Lebron, is Kevin Durant with Nike making $28.5 million. Cristiano Ronaldo is making $21.7 million with Nike. And the fifth most endorsed athlete is Lionel Messi with Adidas making $20 million. Sixth is Tiger Woods making $20 million with Nike, seventh is Kobe Bryant making $15 million with Nike, and eighth is Derrick Rose with Adidas making $14 million. Roger Federer is ninth and makes $9.5 million from Nike. Neymar Jr is tenth and with Nike making $9.5 million, eleventh is Rafael Nadal making $10 million. Even though Neymar Jr makes $.5 million less then Rafael Nadal, in his yearly deals he makes more, this is the case for many other athletes. Twelfth, Dwayne Wade makes $10 million with Li Nian, thirteenth is Damian Lillard who is endorsed by Adidas making $10 million, fourteenth is Rory Mcllory with Nike making $10 million, and last but not least, fifteenth is Maria Sharapova making $8.8 million with Nike.  For most athletes they are associated with their sports. Michael Jordan has his own brand of well-known basketball shoes, run by Nike. Like him other athletes work with companies that advertise their own sports equipment, some such as Michael Phelps with swimwear and equipment, Serena Williams with tennis rackets, and Tiger Woods with golf clubs. Research shows that if an athlete is associated with selling his/her sport related wear or equipment consumers are more likely to believe the endorser and consider the product. With association comes wins, loses, and scandals. An athlete's products that he or she endorses will sell more if they win a championship, breaks a record, or gains a medal. But if an athlete loses, or creates a scandal that athlete's products stop selling or their endorsers drop. One example was when most or all of Tiger Woods's endorsers dropped him when a scandal involving him had been brought to the public eye. Sports association wasn't all that athletes were known for. A player could be known for his style, what he stands for, and others. Advertisements and endorsers have to gain their sponsors through recognition of the athlete or person.

Advertisement with athletes has changed from relations to the player and his sport, to promoting fast food that the player don't even eat or drink. Spectators feel that the athletes are hypocritical and are encouraging kids to eat fast food. They also feel that youth are exposed to athletes enticing them to eat energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods. Professional athletes involved in advertising are associated with 44 different food and drink brands. 79% of the 62 food products athletes endorsed are fast food products. The two athletes that endorse the most fast food products are Peyton Manning and Michael Jordan.  Shooting and airing these commercials not only takes time but it takes money. After endorsement fees, advertising companies add another $10 billion to market, advertise, and promote the association to the athlete. G.M. spent $78 million in T.V. advertising. In 2011 it would cost advertising companies $3 million for a 30 second commercial during the super bowl because big advertised games gained more viewers so it would enhance and advertisers name recognition. Local advertising is less expensive.

smallbusiness.chron.com/influence-sports-stars-advertising-64391.html   smallbusiness.chron.com/disadvantages-sports-advertising-25864.html   https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/fashion/sports-athletes-marketing.html?_r=o   www.totalsportek.com/money/biggest-endorsement-deals-sports-history/   www.hiffingtonpost.com/the-daily-meal/athlete-food-drink-commercials_b_921239.html?slideshow=true#gallery/42405/0   https://www.nsga.org/globalassests/management-conference-archives/2013/Karla-McCormick.pdf   www.therichest.com/sports/other-sports/top-10-commercials-starringathletes/


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