Constructed Wetlands for the Treatment of Agricultural Wastewater

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Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Environmental Studies

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Constructed Wetlands for the Treatment of Agricultural Wastewater

Constructed Wetlands for the Treatment of Agricultural Wastewater

What types of wastewater can they be used to treat? - milkhouse washwater from dairy operations- manue storage and feedlot runoff;-drainage tile outflow;-agricultural field surface runoff;-food processing wastewater

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How does the technology work?Constructed wetlands utilize a series of physical, biological and chemical processes which facilitate the year round treatment of wastewater. As water flows through a wetland, it slows down and many of the suspended solids become trapped by vegetation and settle out. Other pollutants are transformed to less soluble forms taken up by plants or become inactive.Where would the technology be used? How would it reduce pollution?Several wetlands have been constructed on agricultural operations throughout Atlantic Canada and many have been extensively monitored. In most cases, the concentration of wastewater pollutants has been reduced by 70 - 98 %.How might it improve the natural environment?Constructed wetlands have the added benefit of providing excellent habitat for birds and other aquatic species. They also store carbon which helps because it is not being released into the enviornment. Why should we use this technology?It serves as a low cost and potential effective treatment of agricultural effluents. They replace the need for an expensive storage or conventional wastewater treatment system. Additionally, they are aesthetically pleasing and can reduce or eliminate odors associated with wastewater.

Under Atlantic Canada climatic conditions, wastewater entering a constructed wetland should have:(BOD5) < 1000 mg/LTotal Solid <1500 mg/LAmmonia <80 mg/L

The establishment of aquatic vegetation (cattails and bulrushes) is best achieved by direct transplant of plants, roots and soil from a nearby natural wetland. This material should be spread over the entire surface area of the shallow zones in the constructed wetland at a density of 1 plant m^2

ConclusionRefer to handoutReferencesBoyd, N. (2005). Constructed Wetlands for the Treatment of Agricultural Wastewater in Atlantic Canada. Retrieved November 28, 2014, from http://nsfa-fane.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/constructed-wetlands.pdf Constructed Treatment Wetlands. (n.d.). Retrieved November 28, 2014, from http://www.epa.gov/owow/wetlands/pdf/ConstructedW.pdf Constructed Wetlands. (n.d.). Retrieved November 28, 2014, from http://www.ces.uoguelph.ca/water/NCR/ConstructedWetlands.pd


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