Cognitive Theory

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by KelsiJohnson1
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Psychology
Grade:
12

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Cognitive Theory

USE A LEARNING STRATEGY!Take notes, write summaries, rephrase in your own words. Identify the "take away" points. Draw a mind map! Try mnemonic tricks, like a song that helps you remember! (Ormrod, 2011)

Lower-level cognition = learning basic skills, memorizing facts and figures. Higher-level cognition= learning more complex concepts via construction (Ormrod, 2011).

Why Do I Forget?

Big Picture:-Learners actively involved in own learning.-Construction: we build upon previous knowledge.-Give full attention to subject to learn effectively ("being present!")-Meaningful learning (making connections) is more effective than rote learning.-Metacognition: think about & analyze HOW you think & learn (Ormrod, 2011).

Cognitive Theory

Long-Term Memory vs. Working MemoryWorking memory is "active": it holds whatever current info is being learned for a limited time. Long-term memory is like "storage"... a learner retrieves previous knowledge from here (Ormrod, 2011).

Working memory has a limited capacity, like a short grocery list, or simple directions (Ormrod, 2011).

(Being Abhinav, 2012)

(Creedwalk, 2012)

In the video "Talking to the Text" by WestEd, a teacher demonstrates several components of cognitive theory. She helps students construct knowledge by asking questions that encourage building upon what they already know. She facilitates meaningful learning by asking them to make personal connections. Finally, she guides learning strategies by having the students summarize their findings by writing directly on the poem, investigate unknownn vocabulary, and re-write sentences for greater understanding (WestEd, 2001).

Meaningful learning is the process of forming relationships between stored knowledge and new information. It is about making connections in order to transfer stored knowledge to solve new problems (Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001).

An example of a popular mnemonic device to teach US geography (Schooltube, 2009)


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