Cinnabar

In Glogpedia

by sahoff
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Geostudies
Grade:
8

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Cinnabar

Cinnabar is a poisonous mineral because it is composed of the element, Mercury. It is a very heavy and important ore mineral. Cinnabar is the most poisonous mineral in the world. At room temp, Cinnabar turns to liquid.

Cinnabar

Luster: DullColor: RedCleavageHardness: 2-2.5Streak: RedChemical Formula: HgSCrystal System: HexigonalClass: Sulfides and SulfosaltsElements: Sulfides, Sulfosalts, Oxides.

Uses:

Cinnabar is mostly used for its Mercury. Merchants in China useits aesthetic crystals.

History:

Mined:

Bibliography: http://archaeology.about.com/od/cterms/qt/Cinnabar.htmhttp://www.minerals.net/mineral/cinnabar.aspxhttp://www.worstpolluted.org/projects_reports/display/89

The primary use of Cinnabar was grinding it to make a substance called, vermillion. One of its earliest uses known was at the Neolithic site in Turkey where wall paintings included cinnabar's vermillion.

Sawyer Hoff4/154th hourEarth Science

The finest Cinnabar crystals come from China at Tongren, Guizhou Province, at the specific deposits of Wanshan, Yanwuping, and Yunchangping. Almaden, Ciudad Real, Spain, is probably the most historic deposits which also include Idria, Slovenia; Rudňany, Slovakia; Nikitovka (Horlivka), Donets'ka Oblast, Ukraine; and Chauvai, Alai Range, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, and USA.

Formation:

To form mercury, crushed cinnabar ore is roasted in rotary furnaces. Pure mercury separates from sulfur in this process and easily evaporates. A condensing column is used to pick up the liquid metal, which is mostly shipped in iron flasks.

Mercury occurs naturally in the earth and is a liquid metal. A common method for separating mercury from cinnabar is to crush the ore and then heat it in a furnace in order to vaporize the mercury. This vapor is then condensed into liquid mercury. If done wrong, mercury vapor, which is highly poisonous, can escape into the atmosphere.


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.