Ch 24

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by ajdiso
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Chemistry

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Ch 24

Flowering Plants: Structure and Function

RootsThree main parts, zone of cell division, zone of elongation, and zone of maturation. The first zone provides new cells to the zone of elongation where said cell specialize and lengthen. Finally at the zone of maturation the cells are fully matured and distinguishable.

General PartsRoots: Offer not only support and structure but also absorb water and minerals from the soil.Stem: Supports leaves, increasing length of shoot system and also has vascular tissue that transports water and nutrients.Leaves: Typically the main photosynthetic regions of a plant, can specialize to carry out various other processes too.Meristems: Main tissue found in plants that provides for new growth, forms three sub tissues, epidermal tissue, ground tissue , and vascular tissue.Epidermal- protective outer coveringGround- fills interior of plantVascular- support and transport in the plant

LeavesConsist mainly of mesophyll tissue between layers of epidermis. Covering the epidermis is the cuticle which might have trichomes. Stomata are in the lower layers while veins house the vascular tissue. Leaves can consist of a myriad of shapes sizes and colors ranging from cactus needles, maple leaves, or even pine needles.

RootsThree main parts, zone of cell division, zone of elongation, and zone of maturation. The first zone provides new cells to the zone of elongation where said cell specialize and lengthen. Finally at the zone of maturation the cells are fully matured and distinguishable. The main root types include taproots, such as carrots and beets which store food and nutrients, while fibrous roots are found in monocots more often and are useful in securing the plant to the soil. Grasses and trees usually have these fibrous type.

StemsPrimary stem growth occurs in the shoot apical meristem, lengthening of internodes is responsible for stem growth. Nonwoody stems and monocot stems are different from woody stems in the sense that woody stems replace old xylem and phloem on an annual basis, forming rings.

Anthony DiSaverio Maria Jacobs

Photos from Google, video courtesy of YouTube, all other information provided by Mader and Windelspecht biology and from my brain.


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