Carl Sandburg

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by WHS22
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Writers Biographies
Grade:
9

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Carl Sandburg

Carl Sandburg

Born January 6, 1878Died July 22, 1967

Important Biographical InformationSpouse-• Lillian SteichenChildren-• Janet • Helga• MargaretImportant Places-• Galesburg, IL(Birth place) • Flat Rock, NC(Place of death)• Milwaukee, WI(lived and worked for many years)Other important events-• Left school at age 13 and took on odd jobs• He became one of many hobos traveling on trains through the West by the time he was 17• He served 8 months during the Spanish-American war• Attended Lombard College• Professor Philip Green Wright took interest in him and paid for his first pamphlet, Reckless Ecstasy• He was an organizer of the Social-Democratic Party• Secretary to the Socialist mayor of Milwaukee• Collected folk-songs and would go around singing and playing the guitar or banjo

PoetryMost Famous Works-• Fog• Chicago • Grass• Selected PoemsAny particular elements of style unique to that writer-Sandburg wrote in free verse. He celebrated industrial and agricultural advances along with American geography, landscape, and common people. Motivation for works-When Sandburg was a hobo, he traveled the country. He saw the best and worst of America. He chose to write about all the good things he saw along his journies.

GrassBy Carl SandburgPile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.Shovel them under and let me work- I am the grass; I cover all.And pile them high at GettysburgAnd pile them high at Ypres and Verdun.Shovel them under and let me work.Two years, ten years, and passengers ask the conductor: What place is this? Where are we now? I am the grass. Let me work.

Were they successful?-After his debut in Poetry magazine, Sandburg was very successful.Did they recieve any special awards?-Three Pulitzer Awards

Carl Sandburg is like a bald eagle. He is very patriotic and loves his country. When he looks at America he sees its beauty and strength while some other Harlem Renaissance writers saw the negative issues.


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