Next-Gen

Babar the Elephant

by Annamartin7
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
No category
Subject:
No topic
Grade:
10

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Babar the Elephant

Babar the Elephant- Imperialist

Babar the Elephant- No hidden meaning

"Babar is something more than a child growing up." 2"de Brunhoff also presented his children with a theory of history, an unconcious method for interpreting the contemporary economic and political world." 3"Instead of Europe, there is a town; instead of Africa, a jungle. . . The land of the elephants stands for Africa. . ." 4

Being taken to the city and having his mother shot is originally seen as a negative thing for Babar, as he describes the hunter as wicked, just as many natives saw imperialism as negative.

Lets look at some evidence from the book...

After Babar sees the developments that they have in the city and applies them to his life, he is happy, just like many imperialists would say that they were bettering and making the natives happier when they would imperialize and forcefully introduce them to their culture.

It is says that the lady Babar lives with gives Babar whatever he wants, just as an imperializing mother country might claim that they give the imperialized nation "whatever they want" making imperialism an act of generosity by them.

The classic first story about literature’s most beloved pachyderm. After his mother is killed by a hunter, Babar avoids capture by escaping to the city, where he is befriended by the kindly Old Lady. He becomes educated and cultured and, upon his return to the great forest, is crowned King of the Elephants. Translated from Jean de Brunhoff's original French, the adventures of the world's most popular elephant and his friends have enchanted an three generations. Delightfully amusing illustrations make this short collection of classic Babar tales a book to treasure for children young and old.1

This is the description of the book Babar the elephant- In this description nothing is said about Babar being imperialist, and usually in book descriptions there is a nod to the greater metaphor if there is one. Therefore there is not a greater metaphor to Babar the Elephant.

This source is clearly suggesting that there is some other imperialistic component to Babar the elephant, a metaphor for the greater world and imperialist interactions between Africa and Paris.

DISAGREEMENT

2. Ariel Dorfman, The Empire's Old Clothes (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010), 71.

1. Barnes and Noble, Barnes and Noble, Accessed April 22, 2013, http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-story-of-babar-jean-de-brunhoff/1003033078?ean=9780394805757.

5

7

6

3. Ariel Dorfman, The Empire's Old Clothes (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010), 81.

4. Ariel Dorfman, The Empire's Old Clothes (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010), 82.

5. Jean de Brunhoff, The Story of Babar the Little Elephant (New York: Random House, 1933), 6.

7. Jean de Brunhoff, The Story of Babar the Little Elephant (New York: Random House, 1933), 21.

6. Jean de Brunhoff, The Story of Babar the Little Elephant (New York: Random House, 1933), 16.


Tags

Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.