Art Nouveau: Henri Privat-Livemont

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Art Nouveau: Henri Privat-Livemont

Art Nouveau

By: Klara C. Keim

Henri Privat-Livemont(1861-1936)

Cercle Artistique de Schaerbeek(Poster)

Cafes Torrefies (Poster)

Biscuits & Chocolat Delacre (Poster)

Le Masque Anarchiste (Poster)

"Le Masque Anarchiste" or The Masque of Anarchy is a poster depicting the 1819 Political Poem of the same name. It is expressed through intricate detail of the horrors of violence in the social spectrum. Privat uses dark greens throughout the forest and man to emphasize the darkness of the subject. He then uses a lighter orange for the woman to express a softer subject and create an emotion toward the matter. He uses fine details in the swords and faces on the side to create more emotions of distress with the viewer. The intense outlines and details in the painting (along with the organic subject matter such as humans, a forest, and blood express "Art Nouveau" style) He is calling for social reform in this "political poster".

Georges (Henri) Privat-Livemont was a Belgian designer, painter, and posterist. As he entered the world of art, he studied many different mediums such as painting, interior design, mosaics, cartooning, poster production, and graffito. He studied not only in Belgium, but also in France under many great artists such as Lemaire, Lavastre, Duvignaud, and Hendrickx. Privat-Livemont's fame spawned from his intricately drawn posters in the Art Nouveau fashion. His fine detail and unusual subject matter gained him popularity from Poster Magazines. He was one of the earliest components of the Art Nouveau movement and was known as the "uncontested master of Belgian posterists" and the "Belgian Mucha". Although he and Mucha shared the same style & favor of the female anatomy, Privat-Livemont began his work in Art Nouveau earlier than Mucha.


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