Archimedes Project

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by YenuguPr
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Physics

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Archimedes Project

LifeLife

287 B.C.E.- Is Born250 B.C.E.- Archimedes Screw was created??? B.C.E.- The Archimedes Principle was created??? B.C.E.- Estimated the value of pi214 B.C.E. - The Seige of Syracuse began212 B.C.E.- Died

Archimedes was the right person to solve this problem because he is very ingenious and has a lot of perseverance. He would keep on continuing, even when everyone else has already given up. His creativity also plays huge role on this. If he wasn't as creative as he was, more than half of his inventions wouldn't exist. Take for example the Archimedes Claw. It is a "claw" that hooks the bow (the front) of a ship, than jerks it upward, either capsizing the ship, or letting it go, causing it to crash into the waves and get wrecked. Also, how would he have been able to create the "spheres"(one is a star globe while the other is a planetarium, showing the movements of the planets, stars, sun and moon as viewed from the earth) without any of his ingenuity. Archimedes is also very knowledgeable. Without his smarts, he DEFINITELY couldn't have created ANY of his inventions. If someone without his smarts, imagination and determination tried to do what he did, they would fail. Teribbly.

Solution

Archimedes pondered over the solution for many days, until finally, he realized somthing. He noticed that whenever he stepped into his bathtub, the water would immediately start rising up the second his foot touched the water. And the deeper his foot went in, the higher the water would rise up, until it fell out. At this time, Archimedes knew that gold was denser than silver, so if some gold was replaced with silver, the crown would have more volume than identical copy made of pure gold. So to find the volume of the crown, the only thing Archimedes had to do was to submerge the crown with a bar of gold the exact same weight of the one the king had given to the jeweler.P.S. The jeweler did cheat the king.

The Archimedes ProjectBy:Pranav Y.

The Problem

Timeline

Why He Was The Right Person

Archimedes was born in the port of Syracuse, Sicily. In one of his works, called the Sand Reckoner, he says that his father's name was Phidias and that he (Archimedes's father) was an astronomer, which we know nothing about. Most of his life was spent in his hometown, but it is said that when he was young he was educated in Alexandria, Egypt. He created many inventions, such as the catapult, the Archimedes Screw and the a solar death ray. He also estimated the value of pi, saying it was between 3.1408 and 3.1428. The Archimedes Principle is one of his most famous works. Archimedes died during the Second Punic War, in 212 B.C.E. when the city of Syracuse was captured after a 2 year long seige. He was killed during the sack of the city. Plutarch - a greek historian, biographer and essayist - states in one of his most famous works, Parallel Lives, that Archimedes was killed by a Roman soldier. He says that Archimedes was drawing some diagrams in the sand, and a Roman soldier comes to him and commands him to meet his general, Marcus Claudius Marcellus. Archimedes declines, saying "Do not disturb my circles." The soldier was so enraged, he killed Archimedes.

This story takes place around 2,200 B.C.E. ~King Heiron II of Syracuse, Sicily gave a jeweler a bar of gold and commanded the jeweler to make him a crown out of it. Once the jeweler was finished though, the king suspected that he had used some cheaper metal, such as silver, and mixed it with the gold to keep the left-over gold for himself. But since the king had no way to prove this, he asked Archimedes, a greek inventor, astronomer and mathmatician, to do it.***

The photo to the right is a visual representationof the Archimedes Claw.

Archimedes jumping out of his bathtub as he figures out the solution to King Heiron II problem.

The picture to the right is a drawing of the planatarium Archimedes created. They are also called armillary spheres.


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