Andreas Vesalius

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by jadalyn333
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Scientific Biographies
Grade:
7,8,9,10,11

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Andreas Vesalius

AndreasVesalius

-Anatomist & Physician-Andreas proved the work of Galen to be wrong-He dissected human corpses despite the strict ban-Proved the belief of Adam & Eve to be wrong. Men and woman have the same number of ribs-Published the book "De Humani Commis Fabrica (The Structure of the Human Body) in 1543-His findings are still used in modern day medicine because they were so detailed and encouraged others to continue learning about the human anatomy.

Born: 1514 Brussels, BelgiumEducation: University of Paris & University of PaduaFamily: Grew up in a family of physicians

-He was appointed to be the physician to Charles V of Spain & his family-He was accused of murder in 1564 for the dissection of spanish noble who was said to still be alive during it-King Phillip II sent him on a pilgrimiage to the Holy Land.-On his way back he passed away

Biography

Contribution to Health Care

Galen only dissected on pigs and dogs and he related it to the anatomy of a human without actually dissecting one which is why his beliefs weren't accurate.

Based on the biblical story of Adam & Eve it is said that since Adam gave Eve a rib all men have one less rib than women.

His book has over 200 illustrations. The visuals of the muscles are considered very accurate.

Later life

Andreas contributed to medcine in a big way. He proved many beliefs to be wrong even some that were riligious. The book he wrote turned out to be very influential to medicine. Since his work was very detailed it is still used today in modern medicine but of course more updated versions. Without him correcting the false work of Galen the advancement of medicine would have been delayed for many more years.

Summary

Citations

-Andreas Vesalius. (n.d.). Retrieved September 12, 2015.-Science Museum. Brought to Life: Exploring the History of Medicine. (n.d.). Retrieved September 12, 2015.


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