And then What Happened Paul Revere?

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And then What Happened Paul Revere?

And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?By: Jean Fritz

Created By:Kaitlynn LaPoint

SUMMARY:Everyone knows about Paul Revere's Big Ride to Lexington, but this story gives readers more detail about his personal life and what got him to that point. It points out fun facts and other personal accounts in order to make each reader feel more connected to Revere rather than him solely being a historical figure.

HISTORY:Explains the occurances during the battles of Lexington, Concord and Revolutionary War, along with Revere's role, in a historically accurate yet fun way.

Positives:Grabs the attention of younger minds by offering historical information in a fun way. Gives various references about life in that time so students could get a feel for the situation and times. Downfalls:Reads almost like a textbook, so it is easy to put down and forget about. May not retain a student's attention for long.

CULTURE:In Boston, where he grew up, there were often parades, traveling acrobats, monkeys and even pickled pirate's heads on display. He had 16 children which wasn't out of the ordinary, as well.

Portrait of Paul Revere

TEXT TO SELF:As I read, I often found myself pausing to think about how Paul's life compared to mine. He was very young when he took over a business, let alone had a job - my first job was when I was 18. Revere had a lot of responsibilities and his day to day life was so different compared to how mine is in today's current culture; from the way houses looked and were constructed, to the laws and modes of transportation. I noramlly think of historically important people almost as fake becuase it can be so hard to picture them when I'm living in today's society. This book helped me gain new perspective on Revere and the many others who were involved in the events that occured in the 1700s.


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