Ancient Rome

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by FeliciaIfillMarchnineth2
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Ancient History
Grade:
6

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Ancient Rome

Anicent Rome

How achievement lived on in future societies

How achievement impacted that civilization

Explanation of the achievement (identifies time period)

Sources Used

The first conspirator greeted Caesar, then plunged a knife into his neck. Other stabbers followed suit. One by one, several members of the Senate took turns stabbing Julius Caesar (100-44 B.C.E.), the dictator of the entire Roman Empire. Stunned that even his good friend Brutus was in on the plot, Caesar choked out his final words: "'kai su, teknon?" ("You too, my child?").On the steps of the Senate, the most powerful man in the ancient world died in a pool of his own blood.

While it has long been disputed, it's estimated that Julius Caesar was born in Rome on July 12 or 13, 100 BC. While he hailed from Roman aristocrats, his family was far from rich. When Caesar was 16 his father, Gaius Caesar, died. He remained close to his mother, Aurelia. The Rome of Caesar's youth was unstable. An element of disorder ruled the Republic, which had discredited its nobility and seemed unable to handle its considerable size and influence.

During his reign as dictator from 49-44 BC, Julius Caesar had a number of notable impacts on the city of Rome.One of the initial crises with which Caesar had to deal was widespread debt in Rome, especially after the outbreak of civil war when lenders demanded repayment of loans and real estate values collapsed. The result was a serious shortage of coinage in circulation as people hoarded whatever they had. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Caesar ordered that property must be accepted for repayment at its pre-war value. He also reinstated a previous law which forbade the holding of more than 60,000 sesterces in cash by any one person. Caesar later cancelled all interest payments due since the beginning of 49 BC and permitted tenants to pay no rent for one year. While these measures still did not eliminate Rome’s debt, Caesar’s creative reaction to the problem helped to alleviate the debt in a way that satisfied both lenders and borrowers.

http://www.biography.com/people/julius-caesar-9192504#synopsishttp://www.ancient.eu/article/112/


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