Next-Gen

America:The Origins Of A Superpower

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by JeremyRazo
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
African-American History

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America:The Origins Of A Superpower

America:The Origins Of A Superpower

(1865- 1900)by Jeremy Razo

After a war that almost destroyed the entire nation, the U.S sought way rebuild and prosper. With the Industrial Revolution underway, this task could have not come at such an opportune timing. A dawning of a "new" U.S was underway. The creation of the Transcontinental Railroad was the first factor towards the U.S' sucess.

The Industrial Era in the U.S was ruled by three businessmen who all dominated their perspective industries. J.P Morgan led the finance industry, John D Rockafeller led the oil industry, and Andrew Carnegie led the steel industry. These "tycoons" were a symbol of wealth in a country of opportunities.

During this era, people in the U.S decided they wanted to be more jovial as they had a new outlook on life because of the atrocities they had experienced in Civil War. Due to this reason, the entertainment industry exploded. The circus,baseball, basketball, and football all became popular.

At this time, a life in the city seemed tempting. Due to this, many people in the U.S migrated from the rural farmlands to the city. These "urban havens" had luxeries the farmland did not, like electricity, trolleys plumbing, and telephones.

During this time period, a literary and educational movement swept across the U.S. Numerous people went to school as new schools opened, and also began to read for leisure. They often read current events, drama, comedy, and social problems affecting the public at the time. Mark Twain (pictured above) was a famous author during this time.

An influx of immigrants looking to escape harsh reality of Europe, started to arrive in the U.S. Many of them had little to no money, and were intent to accomplish the fabled "American dream" ,however; once the immigrants got "off the boat" many of them became subjects of severe discrimination. Those lucky enough were able to find jobs, but often paid low wages and worked in unsanitary conditions.

(1865-1900)


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