All Right, Then I'll Go to Hell - Episode 9

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by Durfee118135
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Reading Comprehension
Grade:
9

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All Right, Then I'll Go to Hell - Episode 9

Setting: The Phelps House, this is ironically Tom Sawyer's uncle's house.

Mark Twain's purpose in this episode is to make the readers question the things they have learned about blacks and wonder if they can do something about it. It also brings the book together, reuniting Huck with his old friend Tom, who readers knew from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

1) How do you stick up for someone you care about when it is against everything you were taught?2) What is a real friend?

Episode 9 (Ch. 31-33)"All Right, Then I'll Go to Hell"

Author's Purpose:

Essential Questions:

Phelps Family: Tom Sawyer's Aunt Sally, Uncle Silas, and Cousins, Huck pretends to be Tom Sawyer while trying to get Jim backTom Sawyer: Tom Sawyer returns in this episode, pretending to be Sid Sawyer, he still has all these crazy ideas based on all his books and still thinks he is better than Huck

New Characters:

Huck evolved in Episode 9 a lot by ripping up the paper he wrote to Miss Watson about Jim. Huck realizes he does not care about what society thinks, Jim is his friend and he will fight for him. Huck finally got rid of the frauds when he went to the Phelps House to find Jim. Tom Sawyer returns in this episode and promises to help Huck get Jim back, but is really doing it for the adventure, not because he is against racism. Huck has matured more than Tom, but Tom still thinks he is the boss of everyone. Huck learns to stand up to Tom's crazy ideas more.

Huck's Evolution:

The diction on pages 226-227 is pretty negative because Huck is thinking consequences of turning in Jim back to his owner, Miss Watson. He uses words like mad, rascality, disgusted, ungratefulness, and everlasting fire. After writing the note to Miss WAtson about where to find Jim, Huk uses positive diction, using the words good and washed clean. After looking back on the memories with Jim, Huck decides he does not care if he goes to hell, he wants to save Jim, a good person and a great friend.

Diction: (pgs. 226-227)


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