Alexander Hamilton

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by giovonahvittorioso
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History

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Alexander Hamilton

March 1776, after completing his college education, Hamilton obtained a commission in the New York militia as an artillery commander. He trained his men effectively and fought alongside Gen. George Washington's troops on Long Island. Hamilton served in the Continental Congress in November 1782 and expressed his disgust with the disorder and weakness of the national government.Hamilton got his colleagues to support a constitutional convention. The legislature named him one of the state's three delegates to Philadelphia. At the Constitutional Convention, Hamilton, with such notables as James Madison and Benjamin Franklin present, pushed for a powerful executive, one who could serve for life. As an ardent nationalist, he wanted all state laws subject to federal laws. He supported Washington for the presidency and fully expected a top-level appointment in the administration. In September 1789, Washington chose him to serve as secretary of the treasury. Hamilton's financial program caused a protest called the Whiskey Rebellion, when farmers in Pennsylvania refused to pay the tax on distilled liquor. Hamilton used the uprising to exert national authority, and in 1794, he and Washington led an army into the backwoods. The rebellion collapsed, and Hamilton claimed he had proved the primacy of the federal government.

Importance

Born January 11, 1757, on Nevis, a British colony in the Leeward IslandOn July 11, 1804, a duel between Aaron Burr occured at Weehawken Heights in New Jersey. Burr's shot struck Hamilton, who fell mortally wounded. He was taken to the home of William Bayard in New York City, where he died the next day.

Hamilton's largest impact was his work as Secretary of the Treasury. He promised that America would repays its debt, boosting foreign confidence in American investments.

Alexander Hamiltone

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