Ada Byron Lovelace

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by UnkrichProg1
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
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Scientific Biographies

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Ada Byron Lovelace

Born December 10, 1815 in London, England, to Lord George Gordon Byron, a poet, and Lady Byron.

Ten years after Ada met Babbage, he asked her to translate an article on Babbage's Analytical Engine. When she did this, she added her own notes, which were three times longer than the original article. In these notes, she expressed many ideas that eventually let her be known as the very first computer programmer.

Died November 27, 1852 from uterine cancer in London, England.

In 1835, she married William King who, three years later, became the Earl of Lovelace. She then took the title Countess of Lovelace, and together they had three children.

In her notes, she saw the idea of a general purpose computer. They anticipated future developements, including computer-generated music, the production of graphics, and also theorized a method for the engine to repeat a series of instructions (known as looping today). She mentioned that codes could be created for the device to handle letters and symbols, along with the numbers they handled back then. These notes were what she was mainly known for, and she called herself an Analyst and Metaphysician.

Ada Byron Lovelace

At a young age, her mother got full custody of her and decided to raise her as a mathematician and scientist, which in turn let her be mentored by many people, including William Frend (a social reformer), Mary Somerville (the first women to be admitted into the Royal Astronomical Society), and Charles Babbage, who is often called the father of computers. They met in 1833, when Ada was 17, and he mentored her for many more years after that.

In the notes, she stated many ideas that expressed the potential for computers to be used outside of mathematics, predicting the potential of them to be used for both practical and scientific use.

Websites:http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/adalovelace/https://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/lovelace.htmlhttp://www.cs.yale.edu/homes/tap/Files/ada-bio.htmlhttp://www.biography.com/people/ada-lovelace-20825323

In later years, she tried eveloping a mathematical scheme for winning at gambling, but they all failed and it put her in financial peril.


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