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1970s

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Last updated 5 years ago

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Social Studies
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1970s

The epitome of pomp-rock in the Seventies and Eighties, Queen rocked radio and sports stadiums alike with booming, highly produced anthems like "We Are the Champions" and "We Will Rock You." Onstage, the English quartet used elaborate sets smoke bombs, and flashpots — none of which were quite as captivating as the band's lead singer, Freddie Mercury, whose preening and over-the-top vocals helped make Queen wildly popular. Queen's roots go back to 1967, when guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger Taylor joined singer Tim Staffell in a group called Smile. Staffell soon left to go solo, and the remaining two Smiles teamed up with Freddie Mercury (from a group called Wreckage) and later bassist John Deacon. They played very few gigs at the start, avoiding the club circuit and rehearsing for two years while they all remained in college. (May began work on a Ph.D. in astronomy; Taylor has a degree in biology; Deacon, a degree in electronics; and Mercury had one in illustration and design.) They began touring in 1973, when their debut album was released. After a second LP, the band made its U.S. tour debut, opening for Mott the Hoople. Queen's sound combined showy glam rock, heavy metal, and intricate vocal harmonies produced by multi-tracking Mercury's voice. May's guitar was also thickly overdubbed. A Night at the Opera included "God Save the Queen" rendered as a chorale of lead guitar lines. (Until 1980's The Game, the quartet's albums boasted that "no synths" were used.) Queen's third LP, 1974's Sheer Heart Attack, featured "Killer Queen," its first U.S. Top Twenty hit. The LP also became its first U.S. gold. Heavy-metal fans loved Queen (despite Freddie Mercury's onstage pseudo-dramatics, which had more to do with admitted influence Liza Minnelli than with Robert Plant), and the band's audience grew with its breakthrough LP, 1975's A Night at the Opera. It contained the six-minute masterpiece "Bohemian Rhapsody," which featured a campy, operatic section in which Mercury's voice was spread over dozens of tracks. "Bohemian Rhapsody" stayed at Number One in England for nine weeks, breaking the record Paul Anka had held since 1957 for his "Diana." Queen had eight gold and six platinum records. The group's U.S. Top Forty include "Killer Queen" (Number 12), 1975; "Bohemian Rhapsody" (Number Nine), "You're My Best Friend" (Number 16), and "Somebody to Love" (Number 13), 1976; "We Are the Champions" b/w "We Will Rock You" (Number Four), 1977; "Fat Bottomed Girls" b/w "Bicycle Race" (Number 24), for which the group staged an all-female nude bicycle race, 1978; "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" (Number One), 1979; "Another One Bites the Dust" (Number One), 1980; "Under Pressure" with David Bowie (Number 29), 1981; "Body Language" (Number 11), 1982; and "Radio Ga-Ga" (Number 16), 1984. At first their hits were march-like hard rock, but in the late 1970s and early 1980s the group began to branch out. In 1980 they released The Game which featured two big hits in the rockabilly-style "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" and the disco-style "Another One Bites the Dust," a close relative of Chic's "Good Times," that went to Number One pop and R&B. The Game became Queen's first American Number One album. From:The epitome of pomp-rock in the Seventies and Eighties, Queen rocked radio and sports stadiums alike with booming, highly produced anthems like "We Are the Champions" and "We Will Rock You." Onstage, the English quartet used elaborate sets smoke bombs, and flashpots — none of which were quite as captivating as the band's lead singer, Freddie Mercury, whose preening and over-the-top vocals helped make Queen wildly popular. Queen's roots go back to 1967, when guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger Taylor joined singer Tim Staffell in a group called Smile. Staffell soon left to go solo, and the remaining two Smiles teamed up with Freddie Mercury (from a group called Wreckage) and later bassist John Deacon. They played very few gigs at the start, avoiding the club circuit and rehearsing for two years while they all remained in college. (May began work on a Ph.D. in astronomy; Taylor has a degree in biology; Deacon, a degree in electronics; and Mercury had one in illustration and design.) They began touring in 1973, when their debut album was released. After a second LP, the band made its U.S. tour debut, opening for Mott the Hoople. Queen's sound combined showy glam rock, heavy metal, and intricate vocal harmonies produced by multi-tracking Mercury's voice. May's guitar was also thickly overdubbed. A Night at the Opera included "God Save the Queen" rendered as a chorale of lead guitar lines. (Until 1980's The Game, the quartet's albums boasted that "no synths" were used.) Queen's third LP, 1974's Sheer Heart Attack, featured "Killer Queen," its first U.S. Top Twenty hit. The LP also became its first U.S. gold. Heavy-metal fans loved Queen (despite Freddie Mercury's onstage pseudo-dramatics, which had more to do with admitted influence Liza Minnelli than with Robert Plant), and the band's audience grew with its breakthrough LP, 1975's A Night at the Opera. It contained the six-minute masterpiece "Bohemian Rhapsody," which featured a campy, operatic section in which Mercury's voice was spread over dozens of tracks. "Bohemian Rhapsody" stayed at Number One in England for nine weeks, breaking the record Paul Anka had held since 1957 for his "Diana." Queen had eight gold and six platinum records. The group's U.S. Top Forty include "Killer Queen" (Number 12), 1975; "Bohemian Rhapsody" (Number Nine), "You're My Best Friend" (Number 16), and "Somebody to Love" (Number 13), 1976; "We Are the Champions" b/w "We Will Rock You" (Number Four), 1977; "Fat Bottomed Girls" b/w "Bicycle Race" (Number 24), for which the group staged an all-female nude bicycle race, 1978; "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" (Number One), 1979; "Another One Bites the Dust" (Number One), 1980; "Under Pressure" with David Bowie (Number 29), 1981; "Body Language" (Number 11), 1982; and "Radio Ga-Ga" (Number 16), 1984. At first their hits were march-like hard rock, but in the late 1970s and early 1980s the group began to branch out. In 1980 they released The Game which featured two big hits in the rockabilly-style "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" and the disco-style "Another One Bites the Dust," a close relative of Chic's "Good Times," that went to Number One pop and R&B. The Game became Queen's first American Number One album. Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/queen/biography#ixzz2TNhLhAiW

The Bee Gees was a 70’s band who first got together in 1962. Although, they are widely known for playing disco rock songs that got people dancing, the band also experimented with a harder rock sound with some of their songs. At one point, the Bee Gees even dabbled in soul music, with their song ‘To Love Somebody’.Members of the band consisted of three brothers, Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. Robin Gibb left in 1969 to pursue a solo career. That same year, Robin came out with the hit song ‘Saved By The Bell’. But beyond that, he was not as successful as when he was singing with his brothers.In 1972, the three brothers joined up once again as the Bee Gees. After a few years of moderate success with songs like ‘My World and ‘Run to Me’, the band’s future took a turn for the better.Beginning in 1975, the Bee Gees came back strong on the music scene. They churned out smash hit songs such as ‘Jive Talking’’, ‘Nights on Broadway’ and ‘You Should Be Dancing’. The band recorded the soundtrack for the wildly successful movie, Saturday Night Fever. Their hit singles from that album include ‘Staying’ Alive’ and Night Fever’.From-http://www.the70sproject.com/lyrics/artist-lyrics.php?artist=Bee_Gees

The Bee Gees was a 70’s band who first got together in 1962. Although, they are widely known for playing disco rock songs that got people dancing, the band also experimented with a harder rock sound with some of their songs. At one point, the Bee Gees even dabbled in soul music, with their song ‘To Love Somebody’.Members of the band consisted of three brothers, Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. Robin Gibb left in 1969 to pursue a solo career. That same year, Robin came out with the hit song ‘Saved By The Bell’. But beyond that, he was not as successful as when he was singing with his brothers.In 1972, the three brothers joined up once again as the Bee Gees. After a few years of moderate success with songs like ‘My World and ‘Run to Me’, the band’s future took a turn for the better.Beginning in 1975, the Bee Gees came back strong on the music scene. They churned out smash hit songs such as ‘Jive Talking’’, ‘Nights on Broadway’ and ‘You Should Be Dancing’. The band recorded the soundtrack for the wildly successful movie, Saturday Night Fever. Their hit singles from that album include ‘Staying’ Alive’ and Night Fever’.From-http://www.the70sproject.com/lyrics/artist-lyrics.php?artist=Bee_Gees

The Eagles really appeal to me because I still listen to them today. The song hotel California can commonly be heard playing at my house. They are an oldband that remained relevant and cool.

Bees Gees appeals to me because growing up, disco WAS "Staying Alive." That song embodied disco formany ninties kids and has become an important part of society today.

Queen will always be one of the best to me. They pump me up to wrestle, help me celbrate after, and just help me rock out. Queen will always be the champions of Arena Rock.


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