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Alice in Wonderland

In Glogpedia

by Glorie
Last updated 1 year ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Literature
Grade:
9

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The story starts ...

The Mad Hatter

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

"Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the river bank, and of having nothing to do...when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran by her. Alice did not think it so very strange to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!" But when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat pocket and then hurried on, she started to wonder! Running after the strange fellow, she was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole. Down jumped Alice after it (never considering how in the world she was to get out again) and she tumbled into a curious world. This strange land is full of exotic creatures..."

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"is considered to be one of the best examples of the "literary nonsense" genre, and its narrative course and structure have been enormously influential, especially in the fantasy genre.

Notes

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll)

Carroll's inspiration

Alice's adventures have inspired countless stage, film and music interpretations. These range from cheerful and sunny to dark and disturbing, evidence that Carroll's tale speaks to all kinds of creative minds. It is no coincidence that both singer Marilyn Manson and director Tim Burton have been inspired by his books.

The March Hare

The Cheshire Cat

The Caterpillar

The King and Queen of Hearts

In 1856, Dean (i.e., head of the college) Henry Liddell arrived at Christ Church, bringing with him his young family, all of whom would greatly influence his writing career. Dodgson became close friends with Liddell's wife Lorina and their children, particularly the three sisters Lorina, Edith, and Alice Liddell. He was widely assumed for many years to have derived his own "Alice" from Alice Liddell; the acrostic poem at the end of Through the Looking Glass spells out her name in full, and there are also many superficial references to her hidden in the text of both books. It has been noted that Dodgson himself repeatedly denied in later life that his "little heroine" was based on any real child, and he frequently dedicated his works to girls of his acquaintance, adding their names in acrostic poems at the beginning of the text. His friendship with the Liddell family was an important part of his life in the late 1850s, and he grew into the habit of taking the children on rowing trips (first the boy Harry, and later the three girls) to nearby Nuneham Courtenay or Godstow. It was on one such expedition on 4 July 1862 that Dodgson invented the outline of the story that eventually became his first and greatest commercial success. He told the story to Alice Liddell and she begged him to write it down, and Dodgson eventually (after much delay) presented her with a handwritten, illustrated manuscript entitled Alice's Adventures Under Ground in November 1864.


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